Year 6 World War 1 lesson

The student 1:1 devices were not quite ready to be used and my timetable allocated me to one of the Year 6 classes to assist with an Inquiry Topic into World War 1. Hmm – how best to meet the brief?

I selected a number of texts from the Senior School Library, loaded them into a crate with wheels and headed north.

What did I choose? A range of texts about the “Great War” – including titles relating to Chinese soldiers, the Australian Imperial Forces (great language to discuss) and several volumes of the wonderful but underutilised Official history of Australia in the War of 1914-1918  by Charles Bean.

By taking these somewhat ancient tomes I was able to discuss the role of an official historian, censorship, and the age of our school (which is why we have these in our collection).

Students were invited to enter the book gallery and complete a table in any way that they felt appropriate.

The collaboration, obvious interest in content and active discussions around the room were wonderful to behold. The images below were taken with my staff laptop (Toshiba Z20) screen and they worked better than I thought they might.

A number of girls fell in love with Bean’s volumes.
I thought they would look at one volume and no more. Boy was I wrong!
They found a wide range of interesting snippets – and mainly from the text, not the diagrams or photographs.
Great discussion ensued.
The power of the index was realised with information about our town (I rarely see senior students using this vital asset within texts.
Deep thinking and intrigue were evident.
Their excitement and conversation were palpable.
And each time they were asked to move on they did it with alacrity and respect.

The Scene was set at the start with the opening paragraph from “The promise : the town that never forgets : n’oblions jamais l’Australie” by by Derek GuilleKaff-eine (Illustrator), Anne-Sophie Biguet (Translator).

We had 50 minutes together and it was truly wonderful. Thank you 6R.

One thought on “Year 6 World War 1 lesson

  1. Pingback: Collaboration – Margaret Simkin

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